Posts tagged ‘therapy’

Heartache and heartbreak

Parenting has not been anything like I thought it would be. I hear comments from parents about it being the greatest joy in their lives, the best thing they’ve ever done, or the purpose for their very existence – and I want to scream. It has not been the case for me, not even close. Parenting C – through no fault of his own – has been the most difficult thing I have ever done. I recognize how awful that sounds as well as the ramifications for saying it. I wrote this long before posting it; letting it simmer in its sadness and reality long before I decided to share it.

I do remember having a sense of joy in parenting when C was little, despite the complications and before most of his anger and venom had a target. I wonder, had that anger been turned toward the world and not me and sometimes Husband, if I would have had a different outcome than I am experiencing now. I’d like to think so.

But the reality is that it didn’t. We are where we are.

We have landed right back where we started, and far more quickly than I thought we would. A mere two months after C returned home, he is now back in an acute care psychiatric hospital. His behaviors have been escalating, culminating in my calling the police yesterday morning. They called in their psych team that rides with the force, and they elected to put him on a 72-hour hold.

I think both Hubs and I are pretty numb at this point. We have realized we need to find C alternative housing, as we have to be absolutely *perfect* in order to manage C’s behavior, and even when we are, it’s no guarantee. It is no way to live. We’ve been told that if C isn’t in the home, he is very unlikely to finish high school, which is part of why we hoped we could keep him at home for the next year and a half. But the cost is simply too high.

In the biggest act of radical acceptance I can muster, I recognize that this is the way it is, and it is unlikely to change. C is who he is. I hope that he will grow up and grow out of his current mindset, but he may not. My hope is that if we can find him some placement, he will settle in and blossom much like he did while in residential treatment. Given that his issues exist mostly in our home, I find this hope possible despite my nervousness about the unknown in his future.

So where do *I* go from here? If that isn’t the question of my life, I don’t know what is. I recognize that while I have come very far, parenting C is likely always going to overwhelm me in ways I am unable to overcome. I will continue to hope that we can help C become independent and that he’ll live a life that is meaningful to him, whatever that looks like. While I want that for him, I also know that it is what I need in order to have the same for myself.

 

 

 

 

May 25, 2019 at 10:45 pm 2 comments

Mrs. Fix-it

I am undoubtedly harder on myself than I am on anyone else. I am a fixer, and recognizing that I probably can’t fix the situation we’re in with C brings me a lot of discomfort. In my mind, there is some flaw I could have repaired along the way that would have ensured a different outcome than this.

“This,” is a simple word that involves a complex set of issues and solutions. My tolerance level for all things C, surprisingly to me, is very low. I thought I would have recharged while he was gone, but instead I grew used to not living on edge, not feeling like drama was around every corner, and not feeling tense at any given moment. So happy was I, enjoying my own life for the first time in too long to remember, that any threat to that enjoyment brings me down further and faster than I would like.

What Therapist NC told me today is that I need to accept it. All of it. Accept that C is a challenge and always will be. Accept that I’m frazzled and fried and maybe am not capable of having a good relationship with C. Accept that I can’t fix everything. Accept, accept, accept. But don’t go so far into acceptance that it crosses the line into giving up and giving in.

Just where is that line? I admit I don’t really know. I have been badgered by the reality of life with C for so long that while part of me understands I suffer from compassion fatigue, the other part still thinks I can fix (or could have fixed) all of it. On one hand, I moved mountains for this kid, I know I did. I did everything humanly possible to prepare him for this life of his. I did all the things, I know that. On the surface, I can look at it all and know. But what I wonder, deep down, is if in doing all the things, I somehow lost sight of just being C’s Mom, and if that somehow had some effect on where we are now.

And there it is, that self doubt at which I am exceptionally skilled. NC says parents of kids in residential treatment think their kid will either come home totally changed or that their kid is incapable of change. I don’t believe I fall into either camp, really, because I still maintain that I’m the one I expected to change. Whether I changed too much or not at all, I’m not sure, but I know I’m the one I’m most frustrated with. One way or another, I think I expected too much, and mostly of myself.

Today NC middle-named me. Yes, he *actually* middle named me. Right before he told me I am good enough, I have done enough. In perhaps the most therapy-ish moment I’ve ever had with him, he said these words to me. And then he repeated them. And then again. I suppose I needed to hear them. The trick now is to believe them, even way deep down.

April 15, 2019 at 11:29 pm 2 comments

Easy like Sunday morning

When I read through the drafts of posts many years ago that were never published, it’s like reading letters to my future self. I am amazed at how much things have changed and how much they’ve stayed the same. I still question myself, I question my parenting – I question everything. But it’s all in a more forgiving, empathetic way than it used to be.

While I am feeling calmer, easier, and happier these days, I continue to see Therapist NC in order to practice for the storms that are sure to come. He gave me an assignment to write a list of my “Signs of Decompensation” so that I would have a contract of sorts with myself to notice when things get bad and then call myself on it. (Never mind that the word “decompensation” is so darn close to “decomposition” that it goes all sorts of odd places in my head, and I end up down a rabbit hole of weird.) Ultimately, I had a harder time than I thought I would writing that list, and I left all kinds of things off it.

Then I found this in my drafts from many years ago…I talk a good talk about how calm I am in the face of the storm that is our life. One of these days, someone is going to figure out I’m faking it all, posing as a serene parent of a less than serene child. As we try to figure out how to deal with challenge number four zillion and two, I wonder if it will ever be less complicated. Our “normal” seems to be what sometimes feels like emergency management 101. Often it seems as though we are living crisis to crisis, and it’s impossible to keep perspective on things…

Whelp. First of all, no, it won’t be less complicated, past self, but nice try there. And you gave up talking the good talk long ago and just kind of fell apart, if I’m being frank. Faking it? Absoflippinglutely. If no one else figured out that you were anything but serene, your body and mind sure did. Perspective? Don’t even go there. You’ve graduated from emergency management 101 to emergency management 201, but still, there you are.

And there it is. My list. All in one little paragraph from many years ago.

What’s the difference now? I simply hope, with my whole self, that I have learned the skills to weather the storm, however it comes, however it hits. And that enough people have seen my “list” so that even if I don’t recognize my own decompensation, someone else will.

February 25, 2019 at 7:31 pm 2 comments

What We Need

What We Need has functioned as a journal for me over the years, and in my draft folder there’s almost 100 starts that I never published (if you don’t know the meaning behind the title, here is an explanation: Just what do we need, exactly?). As I read through those drafts I am often startled at what I find. They are full of pain and hopelessness and desperation. It doesn’t match what I feel now, but I admit to feeling more than a bit anxious at the thought of C’s return home.

Anxious enough that during a session with Therapist NC and Hubs last week to discuss the “coming home plan,” I found myself admitting that I don’t really want C to come home. It’s not really about C himself, it’s more about not wanting to return to the way things were…or gradually doing so and not realizing it until we are right back where we were before C left.

When I read the old draft of a post (below), I was struck at how much that was our life at the time I wrote it (almost a decade ago), and how much that was our life when C left for treatment last fall. How, I ask myself, did we let it go so long? It astounds me just how painful, just how hopeless, and just how desperate things were for so many years. It’s not as if we didn’t try things – we tried everything. But nothing ever worked. Therapy, meds, interventions, home visits, school changes, homeschooling, living near relatives, living in social neighborhoods with lots of kids, signing C up for things…none of it ever did anything to change what was going on in our home.

Therapist NC would say, if I could channel him, that we’ve all done a lot of work in the past six months and there has been great change. I don’t disagree with him, but it is hard to imagine something different when things have been so much the same for so long. So once again, here I sit, feeling a bit anxious, with good reason to be, but also with some hope – again, with good reason to feel some. The trick will be – as it always is – to find the balance between my expectations and my own self-awareness, with a good dose of hoping I’ll know where the line is so that another decade doesn’t go by with us living so far across the line we can’t even see it any longer.

From 2011…Still, here I sit tonight, completely and utterly perplexed as what to do next. I have a child whose combativeness and behavior are at a crisis point. It starts in the morning when he wakes up, continues from the moment I pick him up after school, and rarely settles before bedtime. With every fiber of his being, C is screaming that he needs something, and we are all at a loss for what it is. While we try and figure it out, I try to ignore the venom directed my way and tell myself it’s not C. I try to stay calm while he screams, relentlessly, about how he doesn’t want to stand here, there, or anywhere. It’s that unreasonable. He’s like a gnat that won’t go away, and he follows me around, forcing my attention, until I lock myself in my room to escape his wrath. Then he starts trying to kick down the door. Yes, we are in an almost emergency state, our little family, and we are failing at being a family. We are at the point where there’s going to be some intervention, and I only hope the intervention comes on our terms instead of some random person walking down the street calling CPS because they hear what sounds like a tortured child.

February 11, 2019 at 5:23 pm Leave a comment

Trouble in the Water

C’s issues have almost always manifested at home instead of anywhere else, really. On one hand, I have been grateful for that because teachers, babysitters, habilitation workers have all loved him. I remember the first time he got in trouble in preschool -everyone was so excited that he finally did something they deemed normal.

On the other hand, the fact that his issues exist at home is cause for concern about the family dynamic. I have always known we were doing *something* wrong that was making C’s behavior worse, more explosive, and more troublesome. That may have been true to some extent in that we, by reacting to his behaviors, reinforced them. We have stopped that for the most part, yet the behaviors still continued. Cue the sigh of relief that it’s not all our fault.

Yet one place C has done remarkably well is in treatment facilities. He has been in the acute care hospital four times in the last two years, and he is always discharged with comments like, “We see no real issues, and he has behaved perfectly well during his time here.” It got to the point where, on his third “episode,” we waited in the ER for nearly 24 hours before the acute care hospital would admit him, despite there being no other option for placement. They attributed his behaviors to behavioral problems instead of mental health problems. I could see where they were going with this, but when my kid is wielding a knife threatening to harm himself, I don’t really care what’s at the root of the behavior, I just want him to get help.

His time at his residential treatment facility has been no different. We’ve already had one of his therapists express disbelief at him being there at all. We are used to that, although I still find it annoying, as if there is some flaw in the therapist that he can’t see past the happy, agreeable front C puts on. Therapist NC here at home promised us we would get a call at some point saying C was in trouble and that it would indicate he had finally settled in and the real work could begin.

The months had gone by and I had resigned myself to this never happening during his entire stay, because let’s face it, C is C and he does things in his own sweet time in his own sweet way, or not at all. But he called us the other night, in enough trouble that if he gets one more strike, he won’t be able to leave campus during the day with us at Christmas, and we’ll have to visit with him in the visiting room only. Yikes.

The relative amount of relief I experienced about this was palpable. I texted Therapist NC about this development, knowing he would be one of only a few people who would understand how ridiculously happy – yes, happy – this made me. Because I know that this means C is comfortable. He is comfortable enough to show himself and his behaviors. And that means he can finally get some help.

December 10, 2018 at 6:45 pm 2 comments

Woke

I read the message of a dear childhood friend with surprise. She talked about the impact of the various health crises of her special needs child on her other children, and how she and her husband had not really tackled that impact well in the midst of everything going on. She is kind of a pillar of amazing-ness to me; she has handled their child’s medical issues with a strength and grace I strive to emulate.

I quickly responded in support that we are all doing our best in any given moment, and I believe that of her completely. I then gently tried to extend that sentiment to myself to see how it felt. I found myself believing it, maybe for the first time ever.

I think I’ve spent 17 years judging – and often judging harshly – myself and how I have handled things with C. I am a fixer at heart, a researcher by trade, and I’m always convinced there is an answer just around the corner. I keep searching for it, because I know if I find it everything will be better.

But I give. I quit. I’m done. No more of that. Whether it took distance from C to realize it, or if I am just waking up, I don’t know. It brings me to tears to think about it – holy cow, I have been hard on myself. From day one, if I’m honest. Not good enough, not doing enough, not doing the right thing, not giving enough, not loving enough. Yet the reality is I have done everything, given everything, and loved so hard it sort of broke me.

I am always doing my best. And I can always do better. Therapist NC wrote this statement on a whiteboard at our very first meeting with him. How I hated that sentiment – and many others – during those early days of therapy. I couldn’t live with dichotomies like that one. I thought it excused things. Gave reasons for C to be an ass and then say he was doing his best in the very next breath (which he did more than once). But perhaps what it really did was bring to light my own deeply-held belief that I was never, ever at my best. Doing better was something I should be doing more of, even though I felt like I was constantly working at it. I had the second part of that therapy statement down, perhaps too much so.

It’s exhausting living with the belief you are never good enough. I am now trying to give myself a little bit of a pass on the “I can always do better” part. Even though I’m not doing exactly as instructed by Therapist Saying #1, I think it’s an okay way for me to work it. Putting down that heavy weight has been a great relief. And in this week of Thanksgiving, I find myself grateful to have finally reached this point of believing I am doing – and have done – my best.

November 18, 2018 at 3:36 pm 2 comments

Unpacking

I wandered into my appointment with my therapist this week without a whole lot on my mind, really, except ongoing pain around which life seems to revolve right now. What came out of my mouth, however, were several revelations I’m not sure I even recognized for what they were until I spoke them aloud. Whether a high pain level lowers my internal filter or makes me care less what anyone thinks, I’m not sure, but it does seem to be an effective conduit for getting things out of my head and into the universe. And somewhat surprisingly, lightning bolts didn’t strike me down immediately for saying these things. Go figure.

The worst of the worst? I’m fairly ambivalent about seeing C when we visit him over Thanksgiving. I haven’t seen him since he left here in August. And he left after a rather violent episode that left us both hurting. Hubs was out of town, C went for pills I inadvertently left out, and the rest is history that will haunt me for years to come. Truth be told, I don’t know that I have actually forgiven him for that incident which, if I’m honest, is probably more at the root of my ambivalence than anything else.

When we talk with C on the phone, he sounds great. Things come out of his mouth that astound me. He seems healthy, well adjusted, and happy. But I don’t really trust any of it fully. It all feels artificial. We won’t know how he’s truly doing until he comes home, and even a visit won’t tell us much. Only when we are all back in our daily routine will we be able to tell if any of these newfound skills will actually stick, and I admit to not having a whole lot of faith in this process. Not really because of C, his treatment center, or Hubs and me. It’s more about the best predictor of the future being the past. Habits, dynamics, behaviors…they are all difficult to change.

So I wait. I continue to work on my sense of inner calm and peace no matter what is going on around me, because I know that’s really all I can do. Staying in the moment and all of that. I am a lot better at that particular skill than I was a year ago. Still, when someone is throwing things, body slamming closed doors, going for knives and pills, and screaming hateful things, it is fairly difficult to be very Zen. I am trying to let those incidents fade from my memory and recognize that a seven month break is pretty significant. A lot of change can happen in this time C is away.

Yet that voice in my head and heart continues. “What if?” I just keep trying to counter the negative answers with, “What if it’s great?” I am reminded of my own Nana, who had unrelenting faith in all of her children and grandchildren. Cousin X could have murdered someone and she would chalk it up to a phase that would pass. So I’m left wondering. What if C grows up, gains insight, recognizes his own role in life, and chooses to jump down on the right side of the fence? Now wouldn’t *that* be something?

November 11, 2018 at 4:17 pm 2 comments

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